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Tidal Wetlands Restoration Project – first of its kind in Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge — The National Wildlife Refuge Association

A multitude of benefits and a model for the future. That’s the result of the recently completed White Slough Tidal Wetlands Restoration Project.

It is the first project in Humboldt Bay to tackle a failing levee, sea level rise and the loss of important habitat by improving infrastructure. This “proof of concept” pilot project has been a team effort spanning five years, two project leaders, three project managers and other professionals. The project provides a resilient living shoreline and flood protection for ranchlands and roads (as a part of US-101). This pilot project would become a team effort, spanning five years, two project leaders, three project managers and many other partners and professionals.

The project consists of 41 acres on the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It began in 2014 shortly after a tide breached the dike in the area, threatening to convert critical marshland to mudflats.

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Ministry of Defence use pine martens to control the grey squirrel population

The Ministry of Defence has joined the fight against grey squirrels. The Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) has installed pine marten den boxes at the Kirkcudbright Training Area. Non-native grey squirrels have displaced reds on the Balmae area of the site near Dundrennan but research has shown where pine martens are encouraged the more cautious reds flourish.

There is evidence of migratory pine marten activity in the area and it is hoped that installing six den boxes will encourage a permanent population.

Deputy training safety officer at the range Scott Maclean said: “Looking after our land and wildlife is extremely important to DIO. We’re hopeful this will make a real difference to the ecology of the area by encouraging the return of native red squirrels.

“We’ll be monitoring the pine marten den boxes using trail cameras and if this initiative is successful, we’d like to expand it to more of Kirkcudbright Training Area.”

Stephanie Johnstone, head of the Dumfries and Galloway Pine Marten Group, said: “We are delighted to be working with the MOD at the Kirkcudbright Training Area.

“The site is actively managed by the MOD to improve biodiversity and the extensive area contains a unique mosaic of habitats that provide opportunities for pine martens and many other species to thrive.

“The installation of den boxes at the Kirkcudbright Range will benefit pine martens by providing them with a safe place to over winter and breed, replicating the scarce natural resource of large tree cavities within the landscape.

“Pine martens suppress invasive non-native grey squirrels at the landscape scale and the establishment of a pine marten population on the range will help support the existing on-site efforts to remove grey squirrels for the protection of the local native red squirrel population.

“The MOD staff at Kirkcudbright have been enthusiastic in their support of our goal to assist the recovery of this native predator in Dumfries and Galloway and we look forward to continuing to collaborate with the local MOD team in the years ahead.”

There are other plans to rejuvenate the Balmae lake area of the site. DIO staff and workers from Landmarc Support Services have been removing non-native plants in a bid to increase insect species.

They’ve also removed scrub to allow more light to reach the forest floor and have improved the path around the lake and added a small picnic area to encourage responsible public access.

And there are plans to reintroduce native fish species, such as brown trout, after Canadian pond weed was removed and a new sluice gate was installed.

This article by Stuart Gillespie was first published by The Daily Record on 31 January 2022. Lead Image: Pine martens are natural predators of squirrels. (Image: Iain Leach Photography).


What you can do

Support ‘Fighting for Wildlife’ by donating as little as $1 – It only takes a minute. Thank you.



Fighting for Wildlife supports approved wildlife conservation organizations, which spend at least 80 percent of the money they raise on actual fieldwork, rather than administration and fundraising. When making a donation you can designate for which type of initiative it should be used – wildlife, oceans, forests or climate.

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Action for Primates has released disturbing footage of Indonesian trappers beating wild monkeys

Action for Primates released disturbing footage that revealed the horrific cruelty of the Indonesian monkey trapping business.

According to Action for Primates, most of the trapped monkeys are used as test subjects in painful experiments, such as toxicity testing.

The footage showed the trappers brutally capturing and beating the wild monkeys.

It also showed the monkeys being forcefully dragged out of nets by their tails and then thrown headfirst into sacks and crates with other captured monkeys.

Some of the terrified monkeys were separated from their infants, too.

This kind of horrific cruelty is a breach of the International Animal Welfare Guidelines.

As a result, Action for Primates as well as Lady Freethinker is calling on the US government to ban monkey imports from Indonesia.

They are also calling for the Indonesian government to stop the capture and inhumane treatment of these wild monkeys, and to enact legislation that will protect monkeys from future harm.

Nedim C Buyukmihci, V.M.D., University of California, said in an email to One Green Planet, “Capturing non-human primates from the wild is unquestionably associated with substantial suffering. The handling and treatment of the monkeys, as seen in the video footage is brutal and inhumane, and a clear breach of international animal welfare guidelines. Such cruelty – the beating and killing of alpha males, removing infants from their mothers, dragging monkeys by their non-prehensile tails in a way that can lead to serious spinal cord injury, and pulling front limbs so forcibly behind their backs that dislocation and fractures could occur – must not be tolerated. Nor must the trapping of wild monkeys. I urge other animal welfare practitioners to strongly object to the Indonesian authorities and international bodies.”

This article by Abigail Jane was first published by OneGreenPlanet on 7 February 2022. Lead Image Source : Courtesy of Action for Primates.


What you can do

Support ‘Fighting for Wildlife’ by donating as little as $1 – It only takes a minute. Thank you.



Fighting for Wildlife supports approved wildlife conservation organizations, which spend at least 80 percent of the money they raise on actual fieldwork, rather than administration and fundraising. When making a donation you can designate for which type of initiative it should be used – wildlife, oceans, forests or climate.

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A Rundown of Wildfire Predictions for the Upcoming Spring Season

The arrival of spring is often a cause for celebration. It marks the time when snow shovels can be put away and heading outside without a heavy winter coat is feasible. Experiencing warm weather again after enduring the bitter cold for several months is also a nice bonus.

Unfortunately, the weather getting warmer is not always a good thing. In some cases, it could also be the spark that causes a wildfire. These past few years have shown us just how fearsome wildfires can be. We need to prepare better for them. One way to do that is by checking out the early wildfire predictions for this year.

Wildfire Predictions for the Spring 2022 Season

For those who may have missed it, the National Interagency Fire Center recently came out with their National Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook. It’s their report detailing their wildfire projects and this one specifically focuses on the stretch from February to March of this year.

The report highlights several regions and assesses numerous factors to come up with wildfire projections for each and every one of them. You should know about the regions that are more likely to experience significant wildfires during the upcoming spring season.

First off, the National Interagency Fire Center says that the southwest portion of the country has an above-normal significant wildfire potential for this spring. The southern area of the aforementioned region will be more prone to wildfires once April rolls around.

People living in eastern New Mexico should prepare for wildfires now. The agency says that significant wildfire risk for that region is already above normal even though it’s only February. The Southern region of the United States could also see its share of wildfires this spring. Oklahoma and Texas residents are encouraged to stay on alert as early as now. People who are staying close to the plains should be ready to act if they see any signs of trouble.

Later in the spring, Georgia, Florida, and the Carolinas are also expected to present above-normal potential for wildfires. Make sure to remember that if you live in one of those states. Significant wildfire potential for other parts of the country is expected to be low to normal through spring.

How to Prepare for Potential Wildfires

Knowing if your area is at risk for wildfires is just one of the things you can do to prepare for them. For this section, we’ll highlight other useful tips that should help you and your family prepare better for any approaching wildfires.

Determine the Cause of Charred Debris Nearby

Have you noticed some charred plants that are reasonably close to where you live? If so, you need to find out what caused those plants to burn. EDS elemental analysis can help determine if those charred pieces of debris were indeed left behind by a wildfire or some other source of combustion. Sign up for that so you know exactly what you are dealing with.

Get Free Emergency Alerts for Wildfires

The Red Cross recommends approaching your local government and signing up for free emergency alerts related to wildfires. By doing that, you will know about a nearby wildfire as soon as the government does.

Prepare a Room Specifically for Protection against Wildfires

Evacuating your home may not always be necessary even if there is a wildfire in the distance. Still, you need to be safe in your home if you intend to stay. The CDC recommends reserving one room that you can keep shut off from outside air. They also suggest outfitting that room with a filter so it can keep the smoke outside.

Plan Several Escape Routes

If the government does tell you to evacuate, you should listen to them. Before evacuating becomes necessary, you should already know about the escape routes you can use. Map out several escape routes and try driving them at least once to see if they are viable.

Prepare Emergency Supplies

As always, you need to prepare emergency supplies. Prepare a first aid kit and don’t forget to include respirators in there. You should also prepare water and food that you can easily carry in your car if you need to evacuate.

Always be on the lookout for wildfires by utilizing EDS analysis and other tools at your disposal. By staying prepared, you and your family can calmly avoid disaster.

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Refuge & Hatchery Friends Photo Contest January 2022 Winner— Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge — The National Wildlife Refuge Association

Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge is located in north-central Nebraska and encompasses almost 20,000 acres. The national wildlife refuge was once a frontier military fort and was established in 1912 as a “preserve and breeding ground for native birds”. Later, the For Niobrara NWR’s purpose was expanded to include the conservation of bison and elk herds, like those that once roamed the Great Plains.

At Fort Niobrara NWR you will see a unique blend of topography, soils, and rock formations. The Niobrara River flows across the national wildlife refuge for 9 miles, cutting deep canyons into the limestone rocks along the river.

You can drive the 3 ½ mile auto tour route near the Visitor Center to see bison, prairie dogs, elk, many different birds, and historical points of interest. There is a scenic overlook just off the highway that runs by the Fort Niobrara NWR. Also, a nature trail descends stairs down to the base of Fort Falls and continues to the Niobrara River.  

Definitely put Fort Niobrara NWR on your list of national wildlife refuges to visit!

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Humpback whales entangled in fishing nets are rescued by Australians using cutters

Wayne Phillips has both feet firmly on dry land as he acts out cutting a whale loose from fishing gear.

The 51-year-old head of marine sciences at SeaWorld in Queensland oversees the park’s marine rescue team – four cutters, a coordinator, a captain and a videographer – who untangle humpback whales that have become bound up in rope and net.

The cutters, he explains, are armed with a gaff – a graphite pole similar to a fishing rod but topped with a reverse knife that doesn’t cut into the whale if it connects – and work in pairs to combat muscle fatigue.

‘It’s an exhausting process’: Wayne Phillips on rescuing tangled whales. Photograph: David Kelly/The Guardian

Out on the water, with a 27-tonne giant in distress, the purpose-built rubber boat used by the team pitches and rocks on the waves.

The goal for the cutters is to aim the gaff to hook the correct rope before pulling it back hard to sever it clean.

“You reach out, lunge out and pull back – and all that’s based on where the tail is,” Phillips says. “You might get one or two shots at it, then the whale might divert or dive.

“It’s an exhausting process. By the end of the day, you’re buggered.”

Phillips has worked in marine rescue for the better part of 28 years, helping dolphins, seals, turtles and other animals when entangled, stranded or sick.

Now a growing part of the work involves disentangling humpback whales.

Humpback numbers have bounced back from near extinction to about 30,000 in what is widely considered a triumph of conservation. But now the species faces a new human threat: climate change.

As the world’s oceans warm and acidify, humpback whales – like other marine species – are altering their ancient migration patterns in search of food and shelter.

A whale entangled in netting Photograph: Sea World
A whale entangled in netting Photograph: Sea World
A whale calf entangled in a shark net at Coolangatta Photograph: Sea World
A whale calf entangled in a shark net at Coolangatta Photograph: Sea World

And as they are wander into new areas along Australia’s coast, the growing overlap with the human world can be lethal.

An invisible problem

Globally it is estimated 300,000 large whales and dolphins die in entanglements each year, though only a fraction are ever recorded.

As definitions vary by jurisdiction, what counts as an entanglement and what gets included in official reports often masks the scale of the problem.

According to records collected by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and the International Whaling Commission, Australia recorded just 436 whale entanglements between 1887 and 2016.

However these records do not include sightings of whales towing gear reported by the public, or whales that have become tangled in crab pot lines. By contrast, Queensland’s shark control program alone recorded 80 humpback whales snagged in its nets between 1992 and 2020.

A whale caught in a shark net at Burleigh Heads. ‘It’s like a ball and a chain,’ Phillips says. Photograph: Blaze Parson
A whale caught in a shark net at Burleigh Heads. ‘It’s like a ball and a chain,’ Phillips says. Photograph: Blaze Parson

Phillips says there were 28 reports of entangled whales along Australia’s east coast last year, of which his team was able to assist in two. He estimates that despite the best efforts of marine rescue outfits around the coast, only one in five reports are acted upon.

Across the country a mix of government agencies and private organisations operate marine rescue teams, each with responsibility for a different area. SeaWorld’s team covers an area that spans south-east Queensland and the northern New South Wales coast as far as Evans Head.

Tohorā<br>Licence is strictly for One Off, Non Excusive Use on the Guardian Australia. Tohora – Eubalaena australis (Southern Right Whale) expedition at Port Ross in the subantarctic Auckland Islands, New Zealand. Thursday 06 August 2020. Photograph Richard Robinson © 2020. Rights managed image. No Reproduction without prior written permission.

Their work generally begins from June, a few months after the first humpback whales are spotted off Sydney on their annual migration north, when the first reports trickle in of whales towing gear – sometimes many metres in length.

They will continue until November when the animals leave on their long journey back south, travelling 10,000km to the Antarctic.

Phillips says the worst material he has come across is nets that include chain, as it is impossible to cut away the material – though these are rare.

By far the most common entanglement are those from crab pots and the ropes that connect the cage on the seafloor to a float on the surface.

A fishing net on a young whale calf at Coffs Harbour. Photograph: Olaf Meynecke
A fishing net on a young whale calf at Coffs Harbour. Photograph: Olaf Meynecke

As whales don’t navigate by echolocation, they will pass through the area and catch rope as they go. Many will try to wriggle free by thrashing or rolling, but often this only binds the ropes tighter.

With time the material collects around the whale’s fluke – its tail – stopping it from hunting effectively as it drags the rope material over thousands of kilometres. One juvenile whale was spotted in Antarctic waters trailing gear in early January, having travelled down the South American coast.

“It’s like a ball and a chain,” Phillips says. “Imagine dragging that around while you’re swimming.

“And then imagine somebody continuously pulling at it because of the drag the water places on that equipment. These animals are so streamlined, they’re built to cut right through the water. Any drag makes it so much harder for them.

“It really is a slow death for the animals.”

‘They see us as part of the problem’

The first step in removing gear is counterintuitive. To cut it off, the team needs to slow the whale down by attaching floats or buoys to the netting it is trailing.

It is a tactic that echoes those used by whalers, and from the perspective of the whale the sound of an approaching engine is still cause for alarm.

“They’re not always happy we’re trying to help them, that’s for sure,” Phillips says. “They see us as part of the problem initially. And at times we have a very predator-prey relationship with the whale.

“He thinks we’re trying to hurt him, so he thinks we’re the predator.”

This relationship makes each rescue extremely dangerous. A spooked whale may attempt to roll, dive, thrash or smack its tail, and escort animals, such as adult whales protecting a calf, may attempt to fend off the approaching boats.

Phillips has worked in marine rescue for nearly 30 years Photograph: David Kelly/The Guardian
Phillips has worked in marine rescue for nearly 30 years Photograph: David Kelly/The Guardian

At least three deaths have been documented among whale rescuers worldwide. Among the earliest was Tom Smith, who died in 2003 while attempting to free a humpback whale in waters off Kaikoura in New Zealand. His body was never recovered.

Canadian whale rescue veteran Joe Howlett, 59, was killed in 2017 moments after successfully freeing an endangered northern right whale in the Gulf of St Lawrence.

Phillips says members of the public should never attempt their own rescue. Even if it does not end in tragedy, it often only makes things worse for the animal.

“Their hearts are in the right place, but if they don’t cut it all off it actually makes our job harder,” he says. “When they cut off some of the net, the whale will swim off quite nicely but unfortunately it’s still a death sentence.

“Any material around that fluke means the whale will end up succumbing.”

The effect of climate change

Dr Olaf Meynecke, a whale researcher at Griffith University and the Whales & Climate program – a collaborative research project between six universities – says climate change is already having an indirect impact on the number of entanglements.

“It’s the food source that drives everything in the whales’ lives, and they’re migrating for six months at a time each year. That requires a lot of energy,” Meynecke says.

“Their advantage is they can store energy in their blubber as fat, but that also means there’s a short amount of time to eat.”

Climate change is affecting the location and amount of available food.

Meynecke says other whale species have been pushing into waters close to humans, and it is expected the same is happening with humpbacks in Australia.

A young whale calf tangled in a fishing net. Researchers say whales are venturing closer to humans amid climate change. Photograph: Olaf Meynecke
A young whale calf tangled in a fishing net. Researchers say whales are venturing closer to humans amid climate change. Photograph: Olaf Meynecke

The most at-risk of entanglement are “overwintering” whales – usually young, non-breeding females that stay in Australian coastal waters through summer and end up trying to opportunistically feed near commercial fishing grounds.

Meynecke’s research aims to forecast how these changes will occur until 2050 by comparing whale movements today with those from hundreds of years ago.

Botanical Illustrator Lesley Elkan. The national herbarium of NSW is relocating to the Australian Botanic Gardens in Mount Annan in the new year with new facilities to help house over a million plant specimens which are currently housed at the Sydney Botanical Gardens site.

He says there are signs whale populations are already starting to arrive earlier than expected and are not always travelling as far north as they used to. If confirmed, there may be steps that can be taken to prevent more animals being lost.

But that would require coordination between governments, science, industry and the whale-watching public to create more centralised reporting systems, change fishing practices, introduce ropeless fishing gear and ban the use of material such as chain in nets.

This might seem a tall order, but Meynecke says the legacy of anti-whaling efforts in the past is a generational shift that has made humpback whales a sacrosanct part of Australian culture.

“It’s been a complete shift in society,” he says. “Our society has gone from ‘I appreciate whaling’ to ‘I appreciate taking photos of whales and paying for it’.

“No one in Australia – not one politician – would ever today come and say let’s kill the whales. This gives me great hope. It shows a capacity for change.”

This article by Royce Kurmelovs was first published by The Guardian on 29 January 2022. Lead Image: A fishing net caught on the tail of a whale. ‘It’s like a ball and a chain …. a slow death for the animals,’ Wayne Phillips says. Photograph: Todd Burrows.


What you can do

Support ‘Fighting for Wildlife’ by donating as little as $1 – It only takes a minute. Thank you.



Fighting for Wildlife supports approved wildlife conservation organizations, which spend at least 80 percent of the money they raise on actual fieldwork, rather than administration and fundraising. When making a donation you can designate for which type of initiative it should be used – wildlife, oceans, forests or climate.

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Striking the Right Chord at the Right Time — The National Wildlife Refuge Association

For the Friends of the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge located on the Gulf Coast in north Florida, the challenge became, “How do we bridge these obstacles? How can we get out of the ‘idle’ mode and move forward?” The task, coincidentally, meshed well with some musical research I was doing at the time. In a short video, guitarist Mark Knopfler was patiently describing playing a basic guitar chord. He positioned his hand carefully on the fretboard and said, “The chord just sits there; you have to practice it to get it to sing.” And, in essence, that’s kind of where we all were nationally. Our beautiful refuge properties were all just sitting there. As Friends, we had to get them to sing again.

Our Friends board put in place four primary virtual opportunities for the public to compensate for the changed availability of resources. The first obvious task was to create an online nature store because the store provides our Friends the greatest income for supporting the refuge. That happened through the genius of our store manager and board member Rita LeBlanc. Secondly, a WeatherStem camera was focused on the historic St. Marks Lighthouse. Weather conditions along the coastline could then be viewed on home computers as well as hand-held devices. Now, almost every morning or evening, social media users show views of beautiful sunrises and sunsets to their friends across the country. Our local television weathercasters often use the camera in their broadcasts. The WeatherStem camera is a wonderful, feel-good virtual trip to the refuge.

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Record number of Yellowstone wolves hunted and trapped in Montana this season

Montana wildlife officials have taken steps to limit hunting on the border of Yellowstone National Park after a record number of park wolves were killed this season.

The Montana Fish and Wildlife Commission voted Friday to pause wolf hunting and trapping for the season in a region of southwest Montana once 82 wolves have been killed in the area. Currently, hunters have claimed the lives of 76.

“The damage you are doing on wolves, this has got to stop,” March Cooke of conservation group Wolves of the Rockies said at a public comment period ahead of the decision, as the Billings Gazette reported.

Wildlife advocates and park workers are alarmed because a record number of Yellowstone Park wolves have been killed this winter, AP News reported. To date, 23 wolves from park packs have been killed: 18 in Montana, three in Wyoming and two in Idaho.

That’s more than during any winter since wolves were reintroduced to the U.S. northern Rocky Mountains more than 25 years ago, and that’s bad for both ecology and tourism, wolf advocates say.

“These are the most viewable wolves in the Lower 48, if not the world,” Cara McGary, owner of In Our Nature Guiding Services, said during the public comment session, as the Billings Gazette reported. “Their economic value cannot be overestimated. Thirty percent of these northern range wolves are now gone, the Phantom Lake Pack has been eliminated. How would you expect any business person to respond to such a loss of essential supply, and what’s the justification for this damage?”

While the commission decided to end hunting for the season in southwest Montana’s Region 3 once the 82 number is reached, it refused calls to lower quotas along the park’s northern border. Lower quotas near the park used to be the norm before they were lifted by Republican lawmakers last year, according to AP News.

The debate comes at a perilous time for gray wolves. The predators lost their Endangered Species Act protections in 2020, though protections in six northern Rockies states were lifted more than a decade ago.

Republican lawmakers in both Idaho and Montana have also relaxed laws to allow strategies like night hunting, snares and aerial hunting in Idaho. So far this year, about 181 gray wolves have been killed in all of Montana as of January 26, The Hill reported. The upper limit is set at 450, and if it is reached then the commission will have to review the quota.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said in September that it was now considering whether to restore protections for wolves in Western states.

This article by Olivia Rosane was first published by EcoWatch on 31 January 2022. Lead Image: A Yellowstone wolf. NPS / Jacob W. Frank.


What you can do

Support ‘Fighting for Wildlife’ by donating as little as $1 – It only takes a minute. Thank you.



Fighting for Wildlife supports approved wildlife conservation organizations, which spend at least 80 percent of the money they raise on actual fieldwork, rather than administration and fundraising. When making a donation you can designate for which type of initiative it should be used – wildlife, oceans, forests or climate.

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Hawaii leads the way by becoming the first state to ban shark fishing

Sharks are disappearing at an alarming rate, largely due to shark fishing and being victims of bycatch. Humans need sharks, but there are few laws that protect them.

In 2011, the Shark Conservation Act of 2010 was signed into law, but that only prohibited the finning of sharks – it was still legal to fish sharks, they just had to be brought to shore with their fins attached.

But now, Hawaii is paving the way for change. It just became the first state in the U.S. to implement a ban on shark fishing.

As of January 1st, 2022, it’s no longer legal to intentionally capture, entangle, or kill any species of shark in state marine waters. The new law, HB 533, was signed into law on World Oceans Day in 2021 by Gov. David Ige as part of a series of bills aimed at protecting aquatic resources.

Violators of the law will be faced with fines ranging from $500 for a first offense to $10,000 for a third or subsequent offense, along with a civil fine of up to $10,000 and an administrative fine of up to $10,000 for each shark captured or entangled (dead or alive).

In addition to fines, violators may also lose any marine licenses, vessels, and fishing equipment.

Hawaii’s Division of Aquatic Resources Administrator, Brian Neilson, stated in a press release, “Our Department is well aware of how important sharks are to maintain healthy marine ecosystems. And we recognize their importance for native Hawaiian cultural practices and beliefs.”

Despite the new law, there are exceptions that allow a lot of wiggle room for offenders to get away.

For example, sharks caught as bycatch will not be counted as a violation. Special permits may also be granted to fish sharks by DLNR.

This isn’t the first time Hawaii has passed unprecedented legislation to help sharks. They were the first U.S. state to make it illegal to possess, sell or distribute shark fins. After they passed the law on shark fins, several other states followed suit. Hopefully, other states will also follow Hawaii’s lead on banning shark fishing and help better protect our oceans.

Sign this petition to save sharks.

This article by Malorie Thompson was first published by OneGreenPlanet on 31 January 2022. Lead Image Source : Sebastian Castelier / Shutterstock.


What you can do

Support ‘Fighting for Wildlife’ by donating as little as $1 – It only takes a minute. Thank you.



Fighting for Wildlife supports approved wildlife conservation organizations, which spend at least 80 percent of the money they raise on actual fieldwork, rather than administration and fundraising. When making a donation you can designate for which type of initiative it should be used – wildlife, oceans, forests or climate.